College of Humanities


B.A. in Religous Studies

  • Overall, such an interdisciplinary program is not geared towards immediate problem-solving skills, but rather towards the acquisition of analytical and critical tools that can be applied to interpret past and current events, public discourses and/or cultural shifts and identities on an ongoing basis. Three outcomes can be identified:

    Outcome (1)

    Description of Outcome (1)

    Students will be able to analyze and interpret religious phenomena and identities and be able to make an informed assessment of their role in current social institutions as well as past historical events. They will identify and discuss disciplinary perspectives on religion, including those of anthropology, sociology, history, art history, philosophy, literature, political science, psychology, social work, and theater. This outcome supports the Essential Learning Outcomes (Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2002), including the knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world; the thorough study of the social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts;

    and foundations and skills for lifelong learning.

    Description of how outcome (1) will be assessed

    Students achievement towards Outcome (1) will be assessed, using multiple evaluation methods:

    a. The examinations and assignments given by the instructor in each class.

    b. The interviews conducted with the student by their advisor, done at least once a semester.

    c. The progress of the student in the integrative capstone, as measured by her grade in the class, and at least one interview with the instructor.

    d. Practicum evaluations (by field instructor) collected at end of practicum/semester.

    e. Postgraduate data will be collected, including exit survey conducted during graduating (last) semester, graduate school acceptance data and post-graduation placement data conducted each year, and a 3 year followup survey.

    Outcome (2)

    Description of Outcome (2)

    Students will be able to acquire cultural and religious literacy in order to better understand world religions and their history, practices, and beliefs. They will use this literacy to develop practices of intercultural dialogue and exchange, including in some cases, the ability to read and translate other languages. This outcome supports the Essential Learning Outcomes (Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2002), including inquiry and analysis and critical and creative thinking, anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges.

    Description of how outcome (2) will be assessed

    Students achievement towards Outcome (2) will also be assessed, using similar multiple evaluation methods:

    a. The examinations and assignments given by the instructor in each class.

    b. The interviews conducted with the student by their advisor, done at least once a semester.

    c. The progress of the student in the integrative capstone, as measured by her grade in the class, and at least one interview with the instructor.

    d. Practicum evaluations (by field instructor) collected at end of practicum/semester.

    e. Postgraduate data will be collected, including exit survey conducted during graduating (last) semester, graduate school acceptance data and post-graduation placement data conducted each year, and a 3 year followup survey.

    Outcome (3)

    Description of Outcome (3)

    Students will be able to critically assess and synthesize the approaches to religion that are presented in different disciplines. Ultimately, students are encouraged to formulate personal approaches to understanding and interpreting religious phenomena and religious identities, bringing together their scholarly investigations, discussions with peers, and personal experiences. This outcome supports the Essential Learning Outcomes (Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2002), including integrative and applied learning, synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies, demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems.

    Description of how outcome (3) will be assessed

    Students achievement towards Outcome (3) will also be assessed, using similar multiple evaluation methods:

    a. The examinations and assignments given by the instructor in each class.

    b. The interviews conducted with the student by their advisor, done at least once a semester.

    c. The progress of the student in the integrative capstone, as measured by her grade in the class, and at least one interview with the instructor.

    d. Practicum evaluations (by field instructor) collected at end of practicum/semester.

    e. Postgraduate data will be collected, including exit survey conducted during graduating (last) semester, graduate school acceptance data and post-graduation placement data conducted each year, and a 3 year followup survey.